omplete QPORIT: WED, NOV 30 - DAY OF DECISION: WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CHESS MATCH

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

 

WED, NOV 30 - DAY OF DECISION: WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP CHESS MATCH


WEDNESDAY NOV 30, 2016

FINAL RESULT 

The World Chess Campionship was decided in a four game rapid chess tie-break. 

Magnus Carlson won a decisive victory to celebrate his 26th birthday and retain his position as the World Champion and number 1 rated player in the world. 

The first game, with challenger Karjakin as white, ended in a draw.  In the second game, Carlson had white, gained a strong advantage, but Karjakin held a draw.

In the third game, Carlson forged a strong attack and won. Needing only a draw to clinch the title, Carlson, nevertheless, pressed for a win and, finally, concluded the match with a stunning queen sacrifice which forced mate.  A great end to the match!

Congratulations Magnus and Happy Birthday!


BEFORE THE FINAL GAMES

On Wednesday, Nov 30, 2016, the next World Chess Champion will be decided.

After 12 games, the World Championship Chess Match is tied at 6-6. Current World Champion, Magnus Carlson, and challenger, Sergey Karjakin, each won one game. The rest were tied.

On Wednesday, Nov 30, 2016 (coincidentally Magnus Carlson's 26th birthday), they will play a series of mini-matches with increasingly short time controls. The first to win a mini-match will be the new champion. If no-one has won (after 14 mini-match games), there will be one final game. In the final game, White has more time than Black, but White must win. If the game is drawn (or Black wins), Black is declared the champion.


AFTER GAME 10

In the World Championship Chess Match, being held this year in New York, Champion Magnus Carlson, in the tenth game (after losing the eighth), opening with his King's pawn, successfully evened the match. 

Sergey Karjakin defended with the Ruy Lopez defence. While the game stayed roughly equal for many moves, Carlson was able to maneuver freely, creating threats, until Karjakin made a minor error. Carlson was able to win a pawn and press his advantage until Karjakin, missing opportunities to force a draw, finally succumbed.

The score is now 5 all with two games left to play.  If the two players are equal at 6 all, there will be a tie breaking series of games which must be played faster and faster.

The match can be watched live over the web (with live commentary!), and can be watched live from an observation room.

Go to worldchess.com for more information.


AFTER GAME 8

In the World Championship Chess Match, being held this year in New York, after seven straight draws, challenger Sergey Karjakin from Russia won the eighth game.

Playing white, World Champion Magnus Carlson, from Norway, opened with his queens's pawn. After a long game, in which Carlson seemed to have the possibility of gaining a slight edge, Karjakin kept holding him off (with seconds to spare before the time limit for the first 40 moves ran out).  Trying to win, Carlson made a risky move, and again Karjakin defended brilliantly, as he has been doing for the whole match so far. This time, however, he was able, not just to hold a draw, but to capitalize on Carlson's risky move and, threatening to queen a pawn, win a queen, or mate Carlson, he emerged with the win.

The match is 12 games long.   If it is tied at the end of twelve games, there is a tie breaking series of games that must be played faster and faster.

The match can be watched over the web (with commentary!), and can be watched live from an observation room.

Go to worldchess.com for more information.


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